Post Graduate Convention

2020 Post Graduate Convention Registration

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2020 PGC Registration Form

2020 Exhibitor
Registration

Exhibitors Register Here!

2020 OAO Exhibitor Brochure

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Joint Providership provided by the Oregon Medical Association.

COVID-19 Announcement:

Due to recent recommendations by the Oregon Governor and State Health Officials, the Oregon Academy of Ophthalmology’s Board has made the difficult decision to postpone the March 13-14, 2020 Post Graduate Convention to August 28-29, 2020. As you know, a large percentage of our patient groups align with the COVID-19’s identified high risk group. Accordingly, for the safety of our patients and members, we believe it is in the public interest to avoid a large gathering of Ophthalmologists from around the state and country at this time.

We continue to strive to deliver a high-value CME event for you and have secured all of our speakers for August 28-29, 2020. PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDARS!  All registrations will be carried over. We are also working on a live stream and possibly even video archive option for the conference to provide the greatest flexibility and participation.

Thank you for your patience and understanding as we all navigate these difficult times.

Location

World Forestry Center
4033 SW Canyon Road
Portland, Oregon 97221

New Dates

August 28, 2020
8:00am to 5:00pm (breakfast at 7:30am)
President’s Reception in the Discovery Museum at 5:00pm

August 29, 2020
8:00am to 2:45pm (breakfast at 7:30am)

Registration Fee

$435 OAO Member Early-Bird (before 8/14/20)
$485 OAO Members (after 8/14/20)
$605 Non-Member Early-Bird (before 8/14/20)
$655 Non-Members (after 8/14/20)
$85 Retired/OAO Life Members
Free for Residents/Fellows
No refunds or cancellations

Target Audience

This activity has been planned for ophthalmology physicians (practicing and retired), and residents in the Pacific Northwest.

Accreditation | CME

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the Joint Providership of the Oregon Medical Association (OMA) and the Oregon Academy of Ophthalmology (OAO). The OMA is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Oregon Medical Association has designated this live activity for a maximum of 13 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

2020 Faculty

Penny Asbell, MD

Penny Asbell, MD

CORNEA
Barrett G. Haik Chair for Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee, Hamilton Eye Institute, Memphis, TN

Jonathan Myers, MD

Jonathan Myers, MD

GLAUCOMA
Chief, Glaucoma Service, Wills Eye Hospital and Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Thomas Jefferson University’s Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Philadelphia, PA

Mitchell Brinks, MD

MITCHELL BRINKS, MD

CHAIR, VISION 2020 USA
Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Casey Eye Institute, Portland, OR

Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD

Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD

PEDIATRICS/STRABISMUS
Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, San Francisco, CA

Daniel Rootman, MD

Daniel Rootman, MD

OCULOPLASTICS
Doheny Eye Center UCLA, Pasadena, CA

Agenda

Friday, August 28, 2020

7:30 – 8:00 AM Breakfast Buffet & Exhibitor Visits
8:00 – 8:05 AM President’s Welcome Jennifer Lyons, MD
8:05 – 8:45 AM Multidisciplinary Management of Orbital Vascular Malformations Daniel Rootman, MD
8:45 – 9:25 AM Botulinum Toxin Use in Strabismus Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD
9:25 – 10:05 AM Making the DREAM Come True! Penny Asbell, MD
10:05 – 10:25 AM Break & Exhibitor Visits
10:25 – 11:05 AM Journal Club: What’s Happened Since OHTS? Jonathan S. Myers, MD
11:05 – 11:45 PM Patient Heterogeneity & Multimodality Management in Thyroid Eye Disease Daniel Rootman, MD
11:45 – 12:15 PM Annual Business Meeting
12:15 – 1:00 PM Lunch
1:00 – 1:40 PM Management of the Adult Strabismus Secondary to Ocular Surgery Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD
1:40 – 2:40 PM Vision 2020 USA:  Improving the Eye Health of the Nation Mitchell Brinks, MD
2:40 – 3:00 PM Break & Exhibitor Visits
3:00 – 3:40 PM Glaucoma: New Algorithms & Depot Meds Jonathan S. Myers, MD
3:40 – 4:20 PM Ptosis Physiology & Mechanisms of Repair Daniel Rootman, MD
4:20 – 5:00 PM Herpes Zoster & the ZEDS Study Penny Asbell, MD
5:00 PM President’s Reception – Discovery Museum

Saturday, August 29, 2020

7:30 – 8:00 AM Breakfast Buffet & Exhibitor Visits
8:00 – 8:40 AM MIGS: Which Surgery for Which Patient for Which Surgeon? Jonathan S. Myers, MD
8:40 – 9:20 AM Cross-linking for Keratoconus & Corneal Infections Penny Asbell, MD
9:20 – 10:20 AM WORKSHOP: Coma Conundrums  Jonathan S. Myers, MD
10:20 – 10:35 AM Break & Exhibitor Visits
10:35 – 11:35 PM WORKSHOP: Challenging Cornea Cases Penny Asbell, MD
11:35 – 12:15 PM Five things you always wanted to know about Strabismus but were afraid to ask  Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD
12:15 – 12:45 PM LUNCH
12:45 – 1:45 PM WORKSHOP: Orbital Cases Daniel Rootman, MD
1:45 – 2:45 PM WORKSHOP: Strabismus Cases Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD
2:45 PM  Adjourn

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS & OBJECTIVES

Making the DREAM Come True! | Penny Asbell, MD
This course will use the recently completed DREAM trial and the publication in the NEJM to teach best practices for randomized clinical trials and their interpretation.

  1. Learn the key steps in planning a clinical trial
  2. Define key question(s) to be answered
  3. Understand inclusion/exclusion criteria
  4. Understand outcome measures and the use of biomarkers

Cross-linking for Keratoconus and for Corneal Infections | Penny Asbell, MD
Describe on CXL works and how it may impact corneal infections and the clinical trial to determine its safety and efficacy for corneal infections.

  1. Learn the importance of improving treatment of corneal infections
  2. Learn how CXL might impact treatment
  3. Understand the key parts of the RCT for CXL use in eye infections

Herpes Zoster & the ZEDS Study | Penny Asbell, MD
This course will review the epidemiology of shingles, how to treat and the role of ZEDS to increase understanding of shingles and the eye and how to treat and the role of vaccines in this disease.

  1. Understand typical presentation of HZO
  2. Understand epidemiology of HZO
  3. Learn current treatments of HZO
  4. ZEDS trial – inclusion, exclusion criteria
  5. Use of vaccines

Multidisciplinary Management of Orbital Vascular Malformations | Daniel Rootman, MD
In this course we will review the classification, diagnosis and multimodal management of vascular malformations of the orbit.

  1. Understand the classification of vascular malformations
  2. Apply appropriate diagnostics for vascular malformations in the orbit
  3. Appropriately select management strategy based on the characteristics of the vascular malformation

Patient Heterogeneity & Multimodality Management in Thyroid Eye Disease | Daniel Rootman, MD
In this course we will review the layers of overlapping complexity in the heterogeneous presentation of TED and the range of global and specific therapeutic options available to patients.

  1. Understand the layers of complexity in heterogeneous presentation
  2. Expand the toolbox of available therapeutic options
  3. Apply options to appropriate clinical situations

Ptosis Physiology & Mechanisms of Repair | Daniel Rootman, MD
In this course we will discuss the limitations of a mechanical theory for ptosis and present an alternative systems based approach to understanding the condition.

  1. Understand the limits of a mechanical theory of ptosis
  2. Understand alternate theories of ptosis
  3. Consider these alternate theories in surgical selection and management of patient expectations

Botulinum Toxin Use in Strabismus | Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD
Review and discussion of evidence-based  indications and outcomes of the treatment of strabismus with Botulinum toxin.

  1. Understand which strabismus patients will benefit most from this intervention
  2. List the advantages and disadvantages of Botulinum toxin compared to surgery for the treatment of specific forms of strabismus
  3. Better identify subsets of patients with the highest potential for therapeutic success

Management of Adult Strabismus Secondary to Ocular Surgery | Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD
Using a case-based format, algorithms will be discussed for the pre-operative evaluation and post-operative management of some common causes of strabismus and diplopia after ocular surgery.

  1. Better evaluate and counsel patients about the risk of postoperative diplopia after ocular surgery, including post-cataract, retinal detachment, pterygium, and glaucoma surgery
  2. Form an algorithm for the evaluation of strabismus after ocular surgery
  3. Gain a more thorough understanding of the risk of postoperative diplopia and possible therapeutic approaches to manage it

Five things you always wanted to know about strabismus but were afraid to ask | Alejandra de Alba Campomanes, MD
Rapid fire review of crowd-sourced questions surrounding eye misalignment, binocular function, and strabismus management.

  1. Clear misconceptions about the indications of strabismus surgery in patients without diplopia
  2. Counsel patients about treatment options for ocular misalignment
  3. Evaluate and treat strabismus

Journal Club: What’s Happened Since OHTS? (the more recent major trials in glaucoma) | Jonathan Myers, MD
This lecture will review findings of several major trials, including the EAGLE Trial and ZAP trial, the UKGTS, the LIGHT study, and other studies on MIGS and pharmacological interventions.

  1. Describe the findings of these trials
  2. Discuss the potential for change in treatment paradigm
  3. Apply these to typical glaucoma patient scenarios

Glaucoma: New Algorithms and Depot Meds | Jonathan Myers, MD
This lecture will review three glaucoma medication depot systems in phase III trials. one of these may be approved for use early in 2020, and we will discuss patient selection, risks and benefits, and implications for workflow.

  1. Describe three new depot drug systems for glaucoma
  2. Describe risks and benefits of these new treatments
  3. Analyze which patients are better and worse candidates for these when they are FDA approved

MIGS: Which Surgery for Which Patient for Which Surgeon? | Jonathan Myers, MD
The spectrum of MIGS procedures will be discussed with emphasis on ideal patient selection for each procedure, and which procedures may be most readily adopted based on surgeon experience, interest, and practice patterns.

  1. Describe ideal patients for each MIGS procedure
  2. Discuss risks of each procedure, and which patients may be at greater risks for complications
  3. Choose MIGS procedures to add to their practice based on interest, experience, and practice patterns

Vision 2020 USA: A powerful instrument for ophthalmologists to better eye health in Oregon | Mitchell Brinks, MD
The state, federal, and international eye care systems welcome thoughtful guidance and leadership from ophthalmologists in our community. Beyond specific CMS and coding details there are large scale and important discussions on the science, policies, and politics and how these factors affect our patients and our practices. In this session, we’ll highlight leading edge of debate for several important questions in this arena that affect your day to day practice.

  1. Articulate the newest federal government opinions on vision and eye health.
  2. Assess the strengths and weaknesses in local and federal vision and eye health legislative priorities
  3. Identify the key national participants in the debate on how to improve eye health in the U.S.

 

Faculty Disclosure Policy

It is the policy of the Oregon Medical Association (OMA) to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in its CME activities. To comply with the Standards for Commercial Support of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the OMA requires members of the planning committee, applicable staff and faculty to disclose the existence of those commercial interests which produce, market, re-sell, or distribute health care goods or services consumed by, or used on patients with which he/she or their spouse/partner either: a) have a relevant financial relationship now, or b) have had a relevant financial relationship during the past 12 months. Non-profit companies, non-health care related companies and government organizations do not need to be included.

Faculty members have declared that they will uphold the OMA’s standards regarding CME activities and that any clinical recommendations are based on the best available evidence or are consistent with generally accepted medical practice.  Please indicate in the comments section of the evaluation form whether you detect any instances of bias toward products manufactured by commercial interests. Please click here to review our 2019 faculty, planning committee and staff disclosures.